HVAC System

HVAC for Luxury Living

HVAC systems for luxury homes are important for more than just maximizing comfort. They're crucial for proper maintenance of furnishings, finishes, artwork, and everything else in the houses. By failing to choose a quality unit, you could end up with devastating consequences for your expensive decor. Let's take a closer look at what HVAC for luxury living entails.

Zoned System

It's not easy to keep everything and everyone in a large home comfortable. Elevated temperatures can dry out and crack your irreplaceable wooden furnishings. The room containing your paintings and art collection may need a temperature of around 70 degrees. And let's not forget you'll need more cooling for your home gym and heat for an elderly family member or baby in a different room.

Fortunately, you can heat and cool your luxury property simultaneously with a zoned HVAC system.

Humidity Control

Excess moisture makes moldings and woodwork warp. It also leads to mold growth, which can destroy your photographs, paintings, wallpaper, upholstery, rugs, and draperies. Excessively low humidity can cause materials like ivory, paper, papyrus, and wood to dry out, contract, and become more fragile.

Consider whole-home dehumidification in the summer and humidification in the winter.

Smart Home Technology

Having to adjust numerous TVs, audio zones, lights, and climate zones spread across different rooms or buildings on your property every day is a daunting task. That's why smart home technology is a lifesaver.

You need an HVAC system with smart controls to let you adjust the temperature and even track energy usage from your phone or tablet on the go.

Air Purification

Your luxury property needs an upscale living atmosphere. Air purification systems like germicidal lights and whole-home air purifiers remove airborne contaminants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and mold spores, which can cause health problems to your family and guests and damage your property.

By installing an advanced HVAC for luxury living, you'll have a truly luxurious experience in your home. If you want to modernize your HVAC system to suit your upscale living needs in the Broken Arrow area, contact us at Air Assurance.

HVAC System

These 5 HVAC Sounds Indicate Problems for Your HVAC

Do you hear strange sounds from your HVAC system? These sounds can be a sign of severe issues. A standard operating unit may make only an occasional click when turning on and off. When you hear some other unusual sounds, however, it may be time to call our professional company to help you out. Here are some noises you never want to hear from your HVAC system.

1. Loud Banging, Rattling, or Thumping Noises

Any loud noise can indicate an issue with the assembly or the motor. If something is loose, you will hear several rattling noises from your system. Heavy banging and clanking sounds are signs that a component has broken loose. If you hear any of these noises, you need to contact our trained technicians for an inspection.

2. Squealing and Screeching

Motor bearing problems or broken belts will make a loud screeching sound. If your belt is loose, you will need to replace it immediately. Once the belt snaps, it can cause the blower to malfunction. Squealing noises occur when parts have lost lubrication. A little oil to the motor and components can help to stop these annoying sounds.

3. Thwapping

What's thwapping? It's similar to the sound of a baseball card in the spokes of a bicycle. This sound indicates that something is stuck in the blower blades. You want to remove this obstruction to prevent any damages to the motor or blades.

4. Repeating Clicking Sounds

When you hear an occasional clicking sound, that sound is normal for the operation of the system. If you hear continuous clicking sounds, that is not a good sign. Clicking sounds might be a sign of a bad compressor or a panel. If that is the case, you will need to replace those parts.

5. Rattling From the Compressor

A fully functioning compressor will not make any rattling sounds. Rattling sounds means that the motor could be failing on your system. If you hear a loud rattling sound, your part might be broken and need replacement. Any noise from the compressor needs to be inspected by a trained technician.

If you hear these sounds from your system, you need to schedule a service call from a professional HVAC company. Our trained technicians will perform a full point inspection of your system. Call [company_name] in Broken Arrow, OK, to schedule a visit today. We also offer plumbing and indoor air quality services.

Thermostats

Thermostat Reading the Wrong Temperature?

Does your home feel blazingly hot but your thermostat reads only 74 degrees? Sometimes, your thermostat can say one thing yet the temperature in your house is entirely different. However, before you call an HVAC technician to complain about a broken air conditioning unit, check if the cause of the problem is something you can easily solve.

Here are some of the common causes of a thermostat reading wrong temperature.

Dirty Air Filter

Your air filter can clog up fast if you have shedding pets or a cold air return in a high-traffic room. A clogged filter will hamper your A/C unit's cooling ability. It can also affect whether or not the unit turns on without involving your thermostat. Replace your air filters regularly.

Dirty Thermostat

Dirt is also problematic for thermostats. A dirty thermostat will have a difficult time reading the correct temperature inside your home. To clean it, remove the cover and gently dust the inside parts using a soft brush.

Wrong Settings

Have you set the temperature without checking whether your thermostat is set to cool or heat? With incorrect settings in place, your A/C system won't turn on and function as expected. Verify that your thermostat settings are suitable for the season.

Dying Batteries

A thermostat does its job quietly, so it's easy for you to set it and forget that its batteries may be dead or dying. Change the batteries and check if normal operation is restored.

Bad Location

Your thermostat will read the wrong temperature if it isn't located in your home's most optimal place. If it's located near drafts or heat sources, or it's in an area that isn't centrally located, you may need to have it moved.

If you can't fix your thermostat problems, contact an HVAC professional soonest possible. A malfunctioning thermostat can lead to inefficient A/C operation and high energy bills.

If you're in the Broken Arrow area and need help with a thermostat reading wrong temperature, contact us at Air Assurance. With over 30 years of experience, you can be sure that we'll solve all your HVAC issues.

Air Conditioning

A Guide to Fixing Cold Spots in Your Home

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If you're like most of the households across the country, running your A/C will soon become a daily activity. Some of you are probably going to notice that certain areas are a lot colder then others, so we thought we'd give you a few simple tips on fixing cold spots right away.

Repair Any Damage to Ductwork

Since ductwork is absolutely essential for the proper cooling of your home, any damage that it experiences will affect airflow. Carefully examine all areas of the ductwork for issues like holes and tears, and don't hesitate to call a technician for additional assistance. Repairs to the ductwork will balance everything again, which will cut down on cold spots.

Install a Zoning System

Cold spots are often caused by the fact that certain rooms take a lot less time to cool off than others do, yet a traditional HVAC system will continue to run until the warmer rooms are cooled off. By upgrading to a zoning system, you can use a central control unit and multiple thermostats to focus your cooling needs on specific areas of your home that you designate.

Unblock Your Home’s Vents

When objects like furniture and boxes are placed in front of or on top of your vents, then this impeded airflow will often cause these rooms to be more difficult to cool off while others get too cold. The solution, luckily, is very simple. All you need to do is check each vent and make sure that there are no obstructions.

Seal Windows and Doors

The edges around your doors and windows are notorious for air leaks, which can quickly cause cold spots to develop. Depending on the size of the leak, you can seal these problem areas with either caulking, spray foam, or weatherstripping. But, don't forget to check for other areas in your home that may have leaks as well.

To learn more about fixing cold spots or other home comfort issues, please contact the HVAC professionals at Air Assurance. We’ve been servicing Broken Arrow and beyond for more than 30 years.

Air Conditioning

Is Air Conditioning Healthy?

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Air conditioning affects on health are overwhelmingly positive, particularly when you compare today’s living conditions to the past. While about 87% of American homes are air conditioned now, this wasn’t always the case. Up until the 1960s, residential air conditioning was rare and frequently not included even in newly constructed homes. As A/C has become a way of life, Americans have benefitted from more than just the comforting sensation of coolness on a hot day.

Here are some ways air conditioning affects on health have contributed to our higher standard of wellness.

Reduced heat hazards.

During summer heat waves in the past, uncontrolled indoor temperatures very commonly resulted in a high incidence of dehydration, heat exhaustion and heat stroke for individuals residing inside non-air conditioned homes. Extreme heat is especially dangerous for infants, small children and the elderly. The widespread emergence of home air conditioning has greatly reduced these health risks.

Healthy humidity control.

High indoor humidity is the source of potential health issues, including toxic mold growth that causes symptoms in susceptible individuals. Chronic moisture sources including high indoor humidity trigger dormant airborne mold spores into the active growth mode that causes illness in some residents exposed to it. The evaporator coil in your air conditioner continuously extracts water vapor from indoor air as part of the cooling process. This function inhibits indoor mold growth by keeping household humidity in the EPA-recommended range below 65%.

Cleaner indoor air quality.

Indoor airborne particulates—dust, lint, dirt and smoke particles—can be a source of irritation and allergic responses for many persons. As your air conditioner circulates cooling through the household ductwork, the air is also repeatedly cleaned by the system air filter. Particulate levels are kept lower and allergy-related symptoms are reduced. In a typical home air conditioning system, the entire air volume inside the house passes through the air filter multiple times eacg day. Remember to replace the air filter monthly throughout the cooling season to safeguard indoor air quality.

For more about air conditioning affects on health and maintaining optimum indoor comfort, contact the experts at Air Assurance.

Ductwork

HVAC Ductwork Basics

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Consistent temperature control and healthy indoor air quality throughout your home rely on HVAC ductwork basics to get the job done. The blower in a typical residential air handler continuously circulates over 1,000 cubic feet per minute of conditioned air as long as the system is cycled on.

Here are some HVAC ductwork basics that show how the elements work together—and how common problems sometimes arise.

  • Residential ductwork is actually two systems: supply ducts and return ducts.

  • Supply ducts deliver conditioned air to individual rooms, entering through a supply vent on an upper portion of a wall, close to the ceiling.

  • Return ducts remove air and convey it back to the air handler to be cooled or heated again. Some houses have return vents in every room, many others have only one central return vent often located in a central hallway.

  • Supply and return air volume in the ductwork system is balanced to ensure neutral air pressure inside each room—the optimum condition for temperature control and air quality.

  • Most ductwork is not visible in a typical home. Usually, the long spans are routed through areas such as the attic or crawl space. Shorter “branch” ducts that extend into rooms may be installed inside wall cavities.

  • Rigid ducts are usually fabricated of rectangular or round sheet metal. Flexible ducts consist of a wire internal coil covered by plastic.

Potential Duct Problems

As ductwork ages, air leaks may develop at joints and other points in the system. Loss of conditioned air into unconditioned zones such as the crawl space or attic is a major contributor to increased operating costs and poor cooling and heating performance. A professional duct inspection including pressure testing can determine the extent of leakage. Proven sealing techniques will restore leaky ductwork to standards.

Thermal gain or loss frequently affects airflow temperature in ducts routed through very hot or cold zones like the attic or crawl space. Insulating exposed ductwork in these unconditioned zones resolves the issue.

Ask the experts at Air Assurance for more about HVAC ductwork basics and professional duct service to maintain indoor comfort and efficiency.

Energy Efficiency

Will Closing Vents in Unused Rooms Help You Save Money?

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When you’re focused on finding ways to save on heating and cooling costs during fluctuating temperatures in Broken Arrow, you might be tempted to close vents in unused rooms throughout your home. While this practice might seem like a sure-fire way to reduce energy costs, the reality is that closing off vents can lead to some unintended consequences.

The following discusses just a few problems related to closing your vents.

Your Energy Costs Could Actually Increase

When you close vents in unused rooms, increased air pressure within the vents might make it more difficult for your HVAC system to blow air into your ducts. Restricted airflow can cause energy efficiency issues similar to clogged air filters.

Extra Strain Can Be Placed on Your HVAC System

If the airflow is restricted to the point that your air conditioner’s coils begin to freeze, the end result could be permanent damage to the compressor. Conversely, low airflow can cause the heat exchanger in your heating unit to overheat or possibly crack.

The Atmosphere in Your Home Could Feel Uncomfortable

The more vents you close, the harder your heater or air conditioner will have to work to keep your house at a comfortable temperature. The added pressure from closing vents will lead to unnecessary energy waste, too.

Mold and Mildew Problems Could Develop

Whenever you close the registers of your heating or air conditioner, lower surface temperatures in unused spaces could allow condensation to occur. This can result in mold and mildew growth behind the air vents within your ducts. If mold and mildew recirculate throughout your home each time you operate your system, it could pose a serious health risk to your indoor air quality and your family. Open your air vents to help keep things nice and dry throughout the system.

Schedule Service Today

From residential to commercial HVAC services, the knowledgeable team at Air Assurance in Broken Arrow covers it all. Whether you’re in need of air conditioning repair, plumbing service, or indoor air quality improvement, give us a call today to schedule an appointment.

Energy Savings

Measure Your Home's Energy Efficiency

While the Department of Energy recommends having a professional energy audit as the most effective method of accessing your home's energy efficiency, it is possible for DIYers to conduct their own audit to pinpoint some of the troublespots and improve efficiency.

What is Home Energy Efficiency?

Simply put, energy efficiency is the use of less energy to power more things. As a homeowner, the more efficient your home, the less you spend annually in electricity.

Major Problem Areas

Perhaps the greatest problem for most homeowners are the drafts that occur in your home. Air escaping through leaks around door frames, baseboards, and window ledges can reduce home energy efficiency by as much as ten to twenty percent each year. Check for cracks around areas where different materials join together. Simple caulk or weatherstripping will alleviate a majority of these issues.

Insulation

Another common problem is an inadequate amount of insulation. Insulation in the attic and walls helps to prevent energy loss throughout your home. While it is difficult to check and replace insulation in preexisting walls, checking the attic is far less intrusive. Review local building codes to identify the minimum required amount of insulation for your home and measure the amount you currently have. Chances are you can improve your home energy efficiency by simply adding insulation.

Lighting

It may be surprising but lighting your home can account for as much as ten percent of your monthly energy bill. Consider replacing incandescent bulbs with more efficient bulbs like LED or compact fluorescent bulbs. Look for ways to better manage the amount of light you use. Dimmer switches and timers can be a viable option.

Heating and Cooling

Your HVAC system should be inspected annually to ensure proper performance. Change filters on a regular basis to reduce the amount of strain put on your unit. If your unit is older than 15 years, consider replacing it with a more efficient system.

Appliances

Appliances can affect your energy bill whether you use them or not. Unplug all appliances when not in use and always consider energy ratings when purchasing new appliances.

To schedule a professional home evaluation, contact us at Air Assurance. We serve the Broken Arrow area.

Thermostats

Common Smart Thermostat Issues

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A smart thermostat comes with a variety of useful features that increase the comfort of your Broken Arrow home and help lower heating and cooling costs. However, even though it contains the latest technology, you may experience some problems when using it.

Here are a few smart thermostat issues that you may encounter.

Software Glitch

A number of homeowners have had their smart thermostats go offline unexpectedly due to a server outage or software bug on the part of the manufacturer. Consequently, they're not able to set the temperature remotely as advertised.

If you're planning to be away from home for a significant period, you may want to have an HVAC technician wire in a failsafe thermostat. That will prevent a failed smart thermostat from wreaking havoc on your property while you're not around.

Malfunctioning HVAC System

Older HVAC systems don't provide a common ('C') wire for thermostats. The C wire is a 24-volt supply that's dedicated to charging your smart thermostat. Power stealing smart thermostats can work with the older HVAC models without needing a C wire. They do so by "stealing" power from your system's existing circuits.

Your HVAC circuits aren't designed to power anything. Therefore, your smart thermostat can cause your HVAC system to malfunction as it steals power. To solve the problem, let a technician add a C wire for you.

Dead Batteries

If your smart thermostat is unable to steal enough power, its battery can go dead. You can solve the problem by using the more reliable C wire.

A failed update could also cause your thermostat's battery to behave erratically. If restarting the device manually doesn't help, you may need to contact a pro to check if you have a wiring problem.

Whether smart or normal, any thermostat can fail and cause damage to your HVAC system and property. Whenever you encounter smart thermostat issues that you can't fix yourself, contact an HVAC professional as soon as possible.

If you're in the Broken Arrow area, solve any of your heating and cooling problems now by contacting the HVAC pros at Air Assurance.

HVAC System

How to Choose the Right HVAC System

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One of the main appliances on residential properties is the HVAC system, which determines the internal temperature in the house each day and makes the environment comfortable for its residents throughout the year. After a decade of use, the HVAC system will need to be replaced as it approaches the end of its lifespan. When it's time to replace the appliance, there are a few tips for choosing the right HVAC system.

1. Consider the Size

When shopping around for a new HVAC system, it's important that the product is large enough to heat or cool the size of your home in Broken Arrow. If you purchase a system that's too small, it will work too hard to heat or cool the interior setting. Oversized systems may work well but will cause you to spend a lot more money to operate it. You can reduce your maintenance costs and utility bills by installing the right-sized product.

2. Look for an Economical System

Purchasing an energy-efficient HVAC system is necessary to ensure that you can keep your operating costs and carbon footprint to a minimum. Look for products that have an Energy Star certification, and check the SEER rating to determine how efficient it is when it operates. Checking the efficiency of the air filters that it uses will also help you to find an economical product.

3. Think Locally

Avoid purchasing an HVAC system that no one in your local area is capable of repairing or servicing. The last thing you want is to have your system break down without having anyone available to repair it quickly. You'll want to own a product that most contractors are experienced working with to prevent it from becoming a headache when it needs to be diagnosed or repaired in the future.

Feel free to reach out to us if you want to learn more about choosing an HVAC system for your home. Call Air Assurance in Broken Arrow, OK, today for more information about the air conditioners we offer to our customers. We provide heating and plumbing services, too.

Efficiency

Check Your HVAC Airflow

Check Your HVAC Airflow

Getting the maximum comfort from our HVAC systems is what it's all about, but sometimes, that can be elusive. Many factors affect HVAC airflow, so whenever we feel we're not getting the best performance, it's important to single out the problem and see if it can be fixed.

Most CommonReasons for Bad Airflow

  1. A dirty furnace filter will slow down your air filter, causing your HVAC system to work harder to deliver comfort. As your unit struggles, you will be running up higher utility bills. Dirty filters can also damage your system, causing parts to wear out sooner than they would otherwise.

  2. A dense furnace filter can be a good thing for keeping out airborne particulates, but if it's too dense, your HVAC system will struggle to pull in enough return air to cool or heat your home. Make sure the filter you choose is within the manufacturer's recommendations. If you need to improve indoor air quality with a denser filter, then you may need to modify your system.

  3. All sorts of things can go wrong with your ducts over time. Ducts are generally out of sight, so you may not see when segments become disconnected, or the ducts crack, develop holes or become blocked. If ducts were not installed correctly in the first place, then they may not be delivering the proper amount of air to each room. Sometimes poor duct design results in constricted segments where air can't get through.

  4. More often than you would think, an HVAC system is installed without enough return vents -- which are the vents that pull in air so that it can be conditioned and delivered through the supply vents. Ideally, the same amount should be drawn in that is distributed, but this doesn't happen when return vents are inadequate.

  5. Ducts or vents are sometimes the wrong size. Air moves through ducts by static pressure; if ducts are too big for the volume of air, pressure will drop and not enough air will be delivered. If ducts are too small, they will restrict airflow.

For more on HVAC airflow, contact Air Assurance.

Air Conditioning

How to Care for Your HVAC Condensor Fan Motor

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The condenser is located in the outdoor unit of the HVAC system, along with the compressor and condenser coils. This HVAC condenser fan motor is key to the proper operation of the entire HVAC system, keeping the air conditioner cool as the fan motor turns the blades, blowing air across the condenser coil where the refrigerant is cooled from hot gas into a liquid. During this process, warm air from the house is exhausted outdoors.

It's important to keep the condenser from overheating or working too hard. Regular maintenance includes lubricating the fan and other parts at least once a year, before you turn the air conditioner on for the season.

Condenser Problems

Some of the main things that can go wrong with the condenser are these:

  • Motor can go bad. If the motor is incorrectly sized in the unit, it is likely to malfunction.

  • If the fan blades are not installed correctly, airflow may be impeded and the motor may overheat.

  • An incorrect start run capacitor or incorrectly sized fan blade may cause a condition called overamping.

  • Poor air flow can also result from obstructions near the unit, such as weeds, leaves, grass, shrubs and garden furniture. Clear all vegetation and debris away from the condenser so it can properly exhaust warm air.

  • Dirty coils can prevent the unit from transferring warm air, which will result in inadequate cooling in the home. The coils should be cleaned annually.

  • Refrigerant leaks can develop in the condenser and the lines leading to it. Insufficient refrigerant can result in inadequate cooling, as well as strain on the compressor, leading to breakdown.

To tell if your condenser fan motor is overheating, place your hand on the unit. You can also check the temperature of the condenser fan motor with a regular thermometer, but it's best to hire an HVAC professional with proper equipment to do the job.

For more on your HVAC condenser fan motor and other HVAC parts, contact Air Assurance of Broken Arrow. Call us to schedule repairs, maintenance or new installations; we've served Broken Arrow since 1985.

HVAC System

Different HVAC Types and Their Benefits

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Driven to boost the efficiency levels in American homes and businesses, the HVAC industry over the last decade has revolutionized HVAC equipment so that it runs cleaner, more efficiently and delivers greater comfort than ever. If you're poised to replace your HVAC system and are planning to shop around among the various HVAC types, read this brief summary on the latest trends.

1. Forced Air/Central Air

The most common type of heating and cooling system, forced air/central air has come a long way. Air is heated or cooled and then delivered through a system of ducts, and distributed through various vents and registers. New technology has vastly improved this type of system, and includes condensing furnaces, modulating air handler fans, scrolling compressors, as well as smart thermostats so you can adjust the temperature when you're away.

2. Heat Pumps

Heat pumps are taking more market share in the cooling and heating industry, as their ability to heat in colder climates is improved. Heat pumps move warm air from the outdoors into the home to heat it, then move warm air from the home outside to cool it. Heat pumps are efficient and clean to run. They generally employ ductwork to distribute conditioned air. Some efficient features available for heat pumps are two- or variable-speed motors for air handlers; two-speed or scrolling compressors to regulate output and backup burners to boost the heat pump's ability to heat during cooler weather.

3. Ductless Mini Splits

As the name implies, ductless mini splits don't require ducts, bur distribute air through air handlers placed around the house. They are a kind of heat pump, so are efficient and clean to run. These are a good choice for a home that has never had ductwork installed.

4. Geothermal systems

Geothermal systems are heat pumps that move heat from the ground or water source into the home for heating and out of the home for cooling. The configuration of your property will be a factor in determining if you can accommodate a geothermal system.

For more on the various HVAC types, contact Air Assurance.

Service and Maintenance

New Home HVAC System: Your Checklist

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If you're moving into a new home, it's a good idea to get to know your new appliances and equipment. Turn things on, look at the owner's manual and find out all the dos and don'ts. And nowhere is that more important than with your new home HVAC system.

The HVAC encompasses the heating, air conditioning and ventilation systems, all of which, when working at their peak, are designed to keep you comfortable. Of the several different kinds of systems, the most common is the forced air furnace and air conditioner, which use ductwork to distribute conditioned air. Whatever type of system you have, be sure to schedule a maintenance visit from your HVAC technician to check it for any potential problems. It always pays to fix things before they turn into major repairs or breakdowns. You don't want a breakdown in the midst of the cooling or heating season.

Here are a few tips for caring for your new home HVAC.

Caretaking for Your HVAC System

  1. Change the air filter. This is the most important thing you can do with a forced air system. Change the filter whenever it's dirty to improve airflow and indoor air quality. Learn which type of filter works best with your system.

  2. Maintain good airflow with your outside compressor/condenser. Clear away dirt, debris, leaves, weeds, grass, shrubs and limbs, as well as garden furniture and tools so that your condenser can adequately exhaust the heat that the refrigerant carries from the home.

  3. Find out whatever you can about your HVAC system. How old is it? If your system is 10 years old or older, schedule a visit from the HVAC technician to check it out and see if it's the right capacity for your home so you can plan for the right size replacement when the time comes. Also, have the ductwork assessed to see if it needs repair or if it is adequate to deliver the right volume of air for your home.

To learn more about new home HVAC issues from Air Assurance. We serve Broken Arrow and the surrounding area.

Service and Maintenance

HVAC Tape and How It's Used

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Some HVAC projects are costly and typically need a professional to perform them. Fortunately, if you're a do-it-yourselfer, there are some tasks that you can handle on your own with ease. One of the tools that will come in handy when performing such tasks is HVAC tape.

What is HVAC Tape?

HVAC tape refers to any tape that's specifically engineered for HVAC installation and maintenance tasks. For example, you can use the tape to seal flex duct, rigid duct material, and sheet metal.

How Do You Apply It?

How you apply the tape to your HVAC equipment makes the difference between dependable, long-lasting performance and expensive inefficiency. Be sure to follow the steps below:

  1. Tear or cut enough tape from the roll if you're sealing a short length of HVAC material. Apply the tape directly from the roll if you're to use it on a longer material. For easy handling, just unroll a few inches of the tape at a go while applying.

  2. Starting with the end you're using, remove the tape liner. Apply the HVAC tape while centered over the area you're sealing. Keep peeling off the liner while applying the tape. Make sure the tape stays unwrinkled on smooth surfaces and conforms to textured or uneven surfaces like reflective insulation and flex duct.

  3. If you're applying the tape straight off the roll, tear or cut it once you establish the exact length that will ensure no leaks or gaps and total system closure. Using excess tape will unnecessarily increase your repair costs.

  4. Finish your tape application by wiping it down thoroughly with a squeegee. That maximizes surface contact, resulting in a more secure bond.

Remember, HVAC tape reliability is crucial to the success of your project. Therefore, only work with a UL listed tape as it has passed a series of tests for shear strength, tensile strength, and adhesion level. If you get stuck and need responsive and reliable HVAC assistance, contact the experts at Air Assurance. We've been helping Broken Arrow homeowners with their home comfort needs since 1985.

Service and Maintenance

Signing an HVAC Contract? What You Need to Know Before Agreeing With Services

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Are you thinking of signing a contract for HVAC maintenance, but you're leery of what it might contain? Knowing what you should expect in an HVAC contract can make a signing decision easier, and provide peace of mind that you'll receive dependable HVAC care. Here's what your contract should contain:

Covered Components

Your contract should list the specific HVAC components in your home that will be covered by the agreement.

Number of Maintenance Visits

While two visits per year is the norm, the contract should state exactly how many you'll receive.

Tasks Completed During Maintenance

It's important that a contract includes a complete list of the tasks a technician will perform on your cooling and heating systems, so you know they're being thoroughly inspected and serviced during each maintenance visit.

Beneficial Cost Savings

A detailed contract should mention the specific savings signing brings you – like the parts/labor for maintenance visits, or discounts on certain services and repairs.

Specific Exclusions

As well as stating what it includes, a contract should also specify any exclusions – such a extra fees for after hours service calls, additions for travel time, or charges for priority service.

Explanation of Labor Calculations

The contract should explain whether the company charges a set service call fee, an hourly labor rate or a combination of the two.

How Minor Repairs Are Handled

It should be clearly stated whether minor repairs will taken care of during maintenance visits (up to a certain dollar amount), or you'll receive an estimate for any needed repairs and be charged for another service call.

Scheduling Responsibility

You need to know if the contractor sends out reminders about scheduling maintenance, or if you'll need to remember to call and make an appointment.

Renewal Details

Will the maintenance agreement renew automatically, or does it expire and leave you without any preventive care coverage on a specific date?

Payment Terms

The payment terms should be clearly spelled out, along with any discount offerings or flexible payment options.

To find out more about the HVAC contracts we offer Broken Arrow homeowners, contact us at Air Assurance.

HVAC System

Smart HVAC: System Automation

In upgrading your HVAC system, you have a lot of different choices. One increasingly popular option is automation. It can be a bit pricey, but there are a number of benefits. Here's a brief guide to help you determine if a smart HVAC system is right for you.

What Is Smart HVAC?

A smart system learns your household's heating and cooling preferences over time and adjusts to them automatically, to provide enough air to keep you comfortable, without wasting energy. They also factor in outdoor temperature when setting the indoor temperature. A variable-speed air handler can provide more air on hotter days, or less air on milder ones.

The system learns your habits, too: whether you like things a little warmer in the morning or a little cooler at night, etc. Some systems even have sensors to detect when someone enters or leaves a room, so that air isn't sent to unoccupied areas.

And in addition to learning your preferences, the system also connects to your phone or other mobile device via an app. This way, you can remotely control the temperature, and even the vents, closing one and opening another as needed.

Benefits of a Smart System

An automated HVAC system is more expensive than your standard model, but it's an investment. It can cut your energy bill by around 20 percent, paying for itself over time. It also ensures you're always comfortable, learning and automatically adjusting to your preferences, rather than making you set and reset the thermostat throughout the day.

Is HVAC automation right for you? To find out, have a professional conduct an energy audit of your home and determine where you're wasting energy. They can also examine your current HVAC equipment, to see if it meets your needs, or what upgrades might be beneficial to you. Then, they can help you choose the smart features that will best benefit your home, and set them up for optimal comfort and energy savings.

To learn more about smart HVAC systems, contact us at Air Assurance today. Broken Arrow trusts us for all its heating and cooling needs.

HVAC System

Importance of an HVAC Water Filter

Everyone knows the importance of air filters in their HVAC system. They keep airborne contaminants from entering the unit and reducing the components' efficiency. But water flows through your system too. Here's why an HVAC water filter is also essential, for commercial and residential systems alike.

The Necessity of Water Filters

There are all sorts of contaminants that can come from your water and build up in your HVAC system. If you have hard water, it can cause scale: a layer of mineral deposits, such as calcium and magnesium, inside your system.

There can also be algae growth on and around the water, as well as just regular dirt. However, the calcium and magnesium cause a chemical reaction when the unit is warm, leading the other contaminants to bond with the surface and stick there. As this debris accumulates, it creates a barrier in your system that reduces heat transfer, forcing the system to use more and more energy.

A water filter eliminates these contaminants, improving energy efficiency. It also prevents corrosion and other problems that can necessitate more maintenance and ultimately shorten the lifespan of your system. Much like your air filter, a good water filter will improve efficiency, reduce overall maintenance, and help your system last longer.

Types of Water Filters

There are several different HVAC water filter types that can help keep your system clean. For a residential system, the best option is most likely a screen filter. Water passes through a screen similar to the way an air filter works. The screen captures debris, while letting clean water flow through.

For commercial or industrial systems, there are more efficient options. A centrifugal separator spins the water, so that debris sinks down to the bottom. And a microsand filter can filter out contaminants up to 50 times smaller than an ordinary screen filter. By choosing the right water filtration system for you, your system will stay healthy and efficient for years to come.

For help buying an HVAC water filter for your system, contact us at Air Assurance. We're Broken Arrow's trusted source for quality HVAC solutions.