• Our Mission
    Help our customers live and
    work in a safe and comfortable
    environment all year long.
  • Need a
    Quality Air
    Solution?
    Choose us!
    Choose a name you can trust.
  • Need a
    Quality Air
    Solution?
    Choose us!
    Choose a name you can trust.
  • Our Mission
    Help our customers live and
    work in a safe and comfortable
    environment all year long.

About us

Who we are

Over the years, Air Assurance has received many awards including the ACCA National Contractor of the Year, Best of Tulsa, Best of Broken Arrow, and Best in Oklahoma along with Tulsa's Fastest 40 growing companies in 2011-2012. They have been recognized by Lennox as one of their top 1% of dealers in North America. Air Assurance was the first contractor in the nation to provide their customers with an all-NATE certified (highest qualifying certification) technician staff. This means, when they send a technician to your home, you can count on safe, effective, and efficient service and installations of today's most sophisticated heating, air conditioning, and plumbing equipment.

A Short History

"Our philosophy has always been and will always be to provide the best possible service to our customers. Exceptional service and customer satisfaction have been instrumental in our growth and we will, in fact, do everything possible to make your experience a positive one." -Mike Rampey

Awards and Recognition

  • 2015 Tulsa World Best in the World
  • 2015 Angie´s List Super Service award
  • 2015 Broken Arrow Ledger´s Reader´s Choice
  • Ok Magazine Best of the Best award 2010-2015
  • Tulsa People´s A List Readers Choice Winner 2015
  • PSO Top Performer 2013-2015
  • GTR Readers Choice award 2008-2015
  • Journal Record´s"Tulsa´s Fastest 40 Growing Companies 2012-2013"
  • Dave Lennox Award Winner 2012-2015
  • Daily Oklahoman Top Places to work 2014-2015

Review Buzz

Reviews from Our clients

From the blog

Latest blog articles
  • The Keys to Preventing Winter Pipe Bursts

    by Mike Rampey

    The Keys to Preventing Winter Pipe BurstsAs winter arrives, the temperatures are dropping more and more. Is your plumbing prepared? When the weather gets below freezing, the water flowing through your home turns to ice, expands, and ultimately a pipe bursts. How can you prevent this? There are a few steps you can take.

    Insulate your pipes

    You can buy long strips of foam pipe insulation at the hardware store. Cut them into lengths to fit each of your exposed indoor pipes and put them on. This won’t prevent the water in them from freezing, but it will slow the flow of heat, keeping them warmer longer.

    Heat your pipes

    If your pipes are in a dry, enclosed space, then wrap them up in heater tape. You can plug it in, and it will generate enough heat to keep your pipes warm, so the water doesn’t freeze. Failing that, you can also use a heat lamp to warm the pipes and keep them from icing over.

    Open any cabinet doors

    For pipes that are in a cabinet under the sink, open the doors up and let the heat in. You’ll likely be running your furnace, so it will be warmer inside than outside.

    Run the water

    If your house has lost power, then plug-in heat tape and warming your pipes using the furnace will be ineffective. However, you can still keep your pipes from freezing. Turn on a slow drip of water from the hot side of each faucet, then a faster one from the cold side. By keeping the water flowing, it will prevent freezing. Even a very small drip should do the trick. It will drive your water bill up a bit, sure, but it’s still cheaper than fixing the plumbing when a pipe bursts.

    For outdoor pipes, drain the water

    Shut off the valves to all your outdoor spigots to keep water from flowing through them. Then, drain all the water from the spigots.

    To learn more about what to do when a pipe bursts, contact us at Air Assurance today. We’ve served Broken Arrow’s plumbing and HVAC needs for over 30 years.

    Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about preventing pipe bursts and other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 918-217-8273.

    Credit/Copyright Attribution: “MikeBird/Pixabay”

    The post The Keys to Preventing Winter Pipe Bursts appeared first on Air Assurance | Air Conditioner Experts Oklahoma | HVAC Services in Broken Arrow.

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  • Want Better Energy Savings? Weatherize Your Windows

    by Mike Rampey

    Want Better Energy Savings? Weatherize Your WindowsAir leaks around your Broken Arrow home account for higher energy bills and a lower level of comfort, and they make your HVAC system work overtime to replace the lost air. Sealing air leaks is an easy and inexpensive way to improve your comfort level and reduce your energy bills, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. Weatherizing windows is a good place to start winterizing your home.

    Benefits of Weatherizing Windows

    In addition to lower energy bills, reducing wear on your heating system, and improving your comfort level, sealing air leaks around your windows will help reduce noise coming in from outside, keep pollen and other allergens out, and provide better humidity control in your home.

    What You’ll Need for Weatherizing Windows

    Weatherizing windows doesn’t require a lot of supplies. All you’ll need is:

    • Silicone caulk.
    • Rope caulk.
    • Weatherstripping.
    • Expandable foam for large gaps and cracks on the window’s exterior.
    • Window insulation kits containing plastic shrink film.

    Exterior Window Sealing

    Start with the exterior of your home.

    • Use silicone caulk to create a seal along the seam where the window frame meets the exterior wall.
    • Use expandable foam to seal large gaps and cracks around the window.
    • Install storm windows if you have them.

    Interior Window Sealing

    Once you’ve sealed the exterior, move indoors.

    • Use silicone caulk to seal the seam where the window frames meet the wall.
    • Open the windows and install weatherstripping to create a solid seal when the window is closed.
    • Apply rope caulk to the movable parts of the windows.
    • If you don’t have storm windows, install plastic shrink film for a solid barrier between the indoors and out.

    Keep your drapes open during sunny days to help warm your rooms, and close them on cloudy days and at night.

    Consider an Energy Audit

    According to Energy Star, a home energy audit helps you pinpoint exactly where your home is increasing your energy costs. If you’d like to learn more about an energy audit, or for more advice about weatherizing windows, feel free to contact us at Air Assurance, proudly serving the Broken Arrow area.

    Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about weatherizing windows and other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 918-217-8273.

    Credit/Copyright Attribution: “israelbest/Pixabay”

    The post Want Better Energy Savings? Weatherize Your Windows appeared first on Air Assurance | Air Conditioner Experts Oklahoma | HVAC Services in Broken Arrow.

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  • Learn the HVAC Heating Season Lingo

    by Mike Rampey

    Learn the HVAC Heating Season LingoIt’s winter in Oklahoma, which means heating season. It’s important to make sure your furnace is in proper shape and can keep you comfortable without driving up your energy bill. How do you do that? First you need to know the lingo. Here are a few important terms to help you navigate heating season.

    AFUE

    Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency. The amount of fuel your furnace gives off as heat, vs. the amount given off as exhaust, by percentage. The higher the number, the more efficient your furnace.

    CAE

    Combined Annual Efficiency. The total efficiency of your furnace combined with that of your water heater, for those who have devices that integrate the two.

    Load Calculation

    A formula to determine what size furnace you need to heat your home properly — i.e. how much heat it needs to produce — based on your home’s square footage, number of rooms, and a variety of other factors. If the furnace is too small, it will be overworked trying to heat your home. If it’s too big, it will cycle on and off too frequently. Both situations waste energy and cause your heating system to wear out more quickly.

    Heat Pump

    An energy-saving alternative to a traditional furnace, it reverses the flow of heat, taking warm air from outside and circulating it through your home. Then in the summer, it acts as an air conditioner to keep your home cool. It’s a good option for climates with milder winters.

    Dual Fuel

    A heating system that can alternate back and forth between electric power and natural gas, to improve efficiency while still maintaining comfort.

    Energy Star

    The federal program that identifies and labels household appliances that save energy. If you see the blue Energy Star logo on your furnace or heat pump, that means it’s been proven to save both money and energy over similar models, without sacrificing performance or features. It’s a great place to start when comparing heating systems.

    To learn more about the terms you need to know this heating season, contact us at Air Assurance. We’ve served the Broken Arrow area since 1985.

    Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about HVAC terms and other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 918-217-8273.

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    The post Learn the HVAC Heating Season Lingo appeared first on Air Assurance | Air Conditioner Experts Oklahoma | HVAC Services in Broken Arrow.

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  • Watch Out for Ice Dams

    by Mike Rampey

    Watch Out for Ice DamsWith winter taking hold in Northeast Oklahoma, beware of ice dams on your home’s roof when it snows and temperatures drop below freezing for extended periods. An ice dam forming on the roof can result in water damage to roofing, walls and attic, along with household belongings.

    What is an Ice Dam?

    While relatively uncommon in Oklahoma, which doesn’t get as much snow or extended freezing as states to the north, ice dams can happen here. They usually result when roof temperatures are not consistent. When snow falls on the higher part of the roof, it melts and begins draining down toward the eaves. Often, those lower sections are colder, since there’s less attic space underneath to warm up the roof.

    This re-freezes the melted snow, which builds into a ridge of ice near the edge of the roof. Snow melt accumulates behind the so-called “ice dam,” and eventually finds its way through the shingles and roof. This can wreak havoc on roofing, walls and attic fixtures, as well as personal items in the attic.

    How to Avoid Ice Dams

    The main goal is to prevent heat from transferring through the roof and causing the snow to melt. Effective air sealing, insulation and ventilation all can accomplish this goal. It’s important to insulate and seal air leaks in the roof, of course, but also in the floor between the attic and the home’s lower levels, along with the attic hatch or door. This will help keep heat in your living spaces, enhancing comfort, saving energy and easing the workload of your heating system. A well-ventilated attic also will help prevent heat buildup.

    You’ll also want to make sure that air ducts aren’t leaking warm air into the attic.

    If you take these steps to prevent ice dams, you will reap a bonus in the summer as well. A properly sealed, insulated and ventilated attic helps with household cooling, preventing the attic from over-heating and transferring that heat downward.

    For more advice on how to prevent ice dams in your Broken Arrow-area home, please contact us at Air Assurance.

    Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about ice dams and other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 918-217-8273.

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    The post Watch Out for Ice Dams appeared first on Air Assurance | Air Conditioner Experts Oklahoma | HVAC Services in Broken Arrow.

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  • Here’s How to Check Insulation Levels in Your Home

    by Mike Rampey

    Here's How to Check Insulation Levels in Your HomeIf you’d like to lower your energy bills and improve your home comfort, addressing sources of air leakage and areas with inadequate insulation can help. Checking two key areas where these problems often occur can help you decide if it’s time to hire a professional to boost the insulation level and seal up air leaks.

    Up in the Attic

    For home attics in our region, the Department of Energy (DOE) advises insulating the floor to R-60, and correcting air leaks to reduce heat transfer with the living areas below. You can perform a couple of easy checks to assess these issues:

    • When it’s dark out, turn on the lights in the rooms below the attic. Go up there, close the hatch and take a thorough look around the floor to locate any leak sources where light bleeds through from below.
    • To judge the insulation level, turn on your attic lights and look around again. If you see the tops of the floor joists in any spot, there’s not enough insulation. If the joists are well-hidden, you likely have a sufficient amount installed.

    You can fix areas of energy waste and increase the efficiency of your home by sealing the attic, installing a vapor barrier on the floor, and increasing insulation to the recommended level.

    Your Exterior Walls

    According to the DOE, your exterior wall cavities should have R-19 in insulation installed, and you should seal leaks in the exterior shell by weatherstripping and using caulk and expandable foam insulation. To assess these areas:

    • Take off the electrical box covers on the exterior walls, then shut their breakers off. Using a flashlight, look inside each box for signs of insulation. If none is visible, your walls probably need insulation.
    • At night, shut off all the interior lights in your home, then walk around shining a flashlight at the exterior walls. Get a helper to follow you outdoors to identify any spots where leaks let the light shine through from inside.

    Contact us at Air Assurance for more advice about increasing the insulation level and sealing leaks in your Broken Arrow home.

    Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about insulation and other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 918-217-8273.

    Credit/Copyright Attribution: “john-kasawa/Shutterstock”

    The post Here’s How to Check Insulation Levels in Your Home appeared first on Air Assurance | Air Conditioner Experts Oklahoma | HVAC Services in Broken Arrow.

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  • Furnace Motor Replacement: ECM or PSC

    by Mike Rampey

    Furnace Motor Replacement: ECM or PSCIf you’re replacing a heating system with a standard blower motor, it’s worthwhile investigating different furnace motor replacement options such as an electronically commutated motor (ECM). Here’s a look at how standard permanent split capacitor motors compare to more technologically-advanced ECM motors.

    Permanent Split Capacitor Motors (PSC)

    Standard PSC motors have just two operating modes: off and on. When signaled by the thermostat, these single-speed motors start up and run on high, then cycle off when the temperature setting is reached.

    Electronically Commutated Motors (ECM)

    An ECM motor can vary its speed in response to changes in your home’s heating needs. The motor cycles on slowly and runs for longer periods on the lowest speed necessary to maintain comfort. When more warm air output is needed, it speeds automatically.

    PSC Vs. ECM Motors

    Here are some additional factors to consider so you can compare how PSC and ECM motors perform and make a more informed decision on which type is the best choice for your home:

    • Energy consumption. A furnace blower unit equipped with a variable-speed ECM motor uses up to 75 percent less electricity than a blower that’s powered by a PSC motor.
    • Maintenance needs. An ECM motor has “true” bearings that don’t need lubrication, it starts, ramps up and stops “softly” and runs on low speed most of the time. Because an ECM motor is under less strain and subject to less wear than a PSC unit, it requires less maintenance.
    • Temperature control. With its longer cycling and variable-speed operation, an ECM motor can provide more consistent temperatures and better humidity control than a one-speed PSC unit that cycles on and off frequently.
    • Equipment lifespan. ECM motors have an expected lifespan of about 90,000 hours, compared to PSC motors that typically last for 40,000–50,000 hours.
    • Air filtration. The prolonged cycling of an ECM motor also means that the indoor air gets pulled through the furnace filter more often, so it’s able to remove more debris from your air supply.

    To learn more about different furnace motor replacement options for your Broken Arrow home, contact us at Air Assurance.

    Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about motor replacement and other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 918-217-8273.

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  • How to Perform Your Own Energy Tests

    by Mike Rampey

    How to Perform Your Own Energy TestsHow’s your home doing, energy-wise? If you’re like most Americans, you probably don’t know how efficient it is at using energy. A professional energy audit could probably enlighten you, but maybe that’s an expense you’re not quite ready to tackle. Until that day comes, you might perform some energy tests of your own and see what you can find out.

    Air Leaks

    Air leaks are one of the easiest energy wasters to locate, and correcting them can help you save 10-20 percent on your utility bill each year.

    Locate air leaks by waving a lit incense stick near obvious places for leaking air, such as around door and window frames, the edge of the floor, along baseboard gaps and where the walls and ceiling meet. Also check around plumbing and light fixtures, switch plates and electrical outlets. Places where two different types of building materials meet on the outside of your home are also likely places for air leaks.

    When you locate air leaks, repair them with caulk and insulation. Put door sweeps under doors and foam gaskets under the plastic covers of switch plates.

    Insulation

    Most homes, whether old or new, are insulation deficient and need a boost. Cover the attic floor with enough insulation to reach over the rafters. Make sure the attic door is insulated and weather stripped. Insulate ductwork in unconditioned spaces.

    You can blow in wall insulation this way: locate studs with a stud finder, cut out 2-inch holes in the drywall (saving the sections), then aim the applicator hose in the holes and blow in the insulation. You will have to reinsert the drywall hole sections and patch and paint.

    Check Your Equipment

    Check the efficiency of your HVAC system. If it’s an older model, it could be time for replacement. Choose a more efficient Energy Star model.

    Change to Efficient Lighting

    Switch to efficient incandescent, fluorescent or light-emitting diode bulbs to save on electricity.

    Want to learn more about do-it-yourself energy tests? Contact Air Assurance. We provide safe, effective and efficient service and installations in Broken Arrow.

    Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about energy tests and other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 918-217-8273.

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    The post How to Perform Your Own Energy Tests appeared first on Air Assurance | Air Conditioner Experts Oklahoma | HVAC Services in Broken Arrow.

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  • Learn How to Check for a P-Trap Clog

    by Mike Rampey

    Learn How to Check for a P-Trap ClogA clog in your drains can certainly ruin your day. The good news is, some clogs are more manageable by the homeowner than others, and depending on where they occur, you may be able to handle the unclogging yourself. For instance, when a clog occurs in that bent portion of pipe beneath your kitchen or bathroom sink — known as the p-trap — you may be able to unclog it yourself.

    What P-Traps Do

    P-traps aren’t designed with a curve just to fit in your cabinet space. The curve actually has a purpose: it holds water continuously so that it blocks sewer gases emerging from nearby sewer lines from drifting into your drain and up through your sink.

    But the curved design also helps to trap substances in the drain other than water, such as hair, hairpins, and sludge from soap and other substances.

    Clearing a Clog

    As with any clog, you should start with the simplest solutions first. Try clearing the clog by pouring a half cup of baking soda followed by a half cup of vinegar. Leave it to bubble for five minutes, then turn on the hot water and let it run for a minute or so.

    If the clog persists, you can use a coat hanger or drain snake in the drain to see if it clears. A clog lodged in the p-trap may be hard to dislodge, so you may need to move to the next step.

    Clearing the P-Trap

    Assemble a few things to remove the trap, including adjustable pliers, latex gloves, an old towel and wash cloth and a bucket. Place the bucket under the trap to catch water and sludge when you remove the trap.

    Using the pliers, loosen the nuts that hold the trap in place. Remove the trap, emptying the water and cleaning out any clog material. Put a wet wash cloth in the open pipe coming out of the wall to prevent sewer gases from escaping. Reattach the pipe.

    For more on clearing a p-trap clog, contact Air Assurance of Broken Arrow. We’ve served our loyal customers since 1985.

    Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about P-traps and other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 918-217-8273.

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    The post Learn How to Check for a P-Trap Clog appeared first on Air Assurance | Air Conditioner Experts Oklahoma | HVAC Services in Broken Arrow.

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  • Winter Season Home Safety Precautions

    by Mike Rampey

    Winter Season Home Safety PrecautionsWinter is coming to Oklahoma, and that means practicing winter home safety. Some types of heating systems represent greater hazards than others, so be sure to be up on how to operate yours safely.

    Furnace Checkup

    At the start of the heating season, perform a few basic tasks, such as checking the furnace filter. A clean filter will help the furnace run more efficiently, promoting good airflow. Also make sure that there are no obstructions around the vents so that heated air can flow without hindrance and warm the room properly.

    It’s always recommended to schedule a furnace checkup by a professional as you start the heating season. Your technician should perform several critical tasks, including these:

    • Check thermostat and controls, adjusting if needed.
    • Clean and adjust burners and pilot assembly.
    • Clean and adjust burners for most efficient operation.
    • Check for gas leaks.
    • Adjust tension in belts if needed.
    • Lubricate moving parts, particularly in the blower.
    • Inspect draft pipe and draft diverter.
    • Test manifold pressure.
    • Inspect the heat exchanger for cracks that might emit carbon monoxide, an odorless, tasteless, invisible byproduct of the combustion process.

    Electrical Heating

    With all types of electrical heating systems, make sure electrical connections are tight and frayed wires replaced. With heat pumps, make sure refrigerant levels are properly charged and that there are no obstructions on the outdoor compressor.

    Fireplace

    Check fireplace flues and chimneys, ensuring they are clean and clear of obstructions. Keep flammable objects well away from the fireplace. Place a screen cover in front of the flame so that no sparks fly out and start a fire in the living space.

    Space Heaters

    Keep space heaters a safe distance from furniture, bedding or any other objects that might catch fire. Make sure electrical connections are tight and that cords are not frayed.

    Carbon Monoxide Monitors

    Install carbon monoxide monitors in your home if you have any combustion-powered appliances. Install them on every floor at least 5 feet from the ground.

    To learn more about winter home safety, contact Air Assurance of Broken Arrow and Tulsa at 918-894-5760.

    Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about winter home safety and other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 918-217-8273.

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    The post Winter Season Home Safety Precautions appeared first on Air Assurance | Air Conditioner Experts Oklahoma | HVAC Services in Broken Arrow.

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  • Signs That Your Ductwork is Getting Too Old

    by Mike Rampey

    Signs That Your Ductwork is Getting Too OldYour ductwork isn’t out in plain view, so you may not think of it often or realize that its age can directly affect how well your HVAC system functions. Old ductwork that’s deteriorating can gradually erode your HVAC system’s energy efficiency, reduce your comfort and even degrade the air quality in your home. Once you know what to look for, it’s easy to spot the signs that your aging ducts may need replacement.

    Signs That Your Old Ducts Need Replacement

    Here are a few of the indicators that aging ductwork is a problem in your home:

    • Ineffective design. Ducts that were installed 15 or more years ago often have serious design flaws. Nowadays, HVAC system installers design ductwork using Manual D calculations so that the duct sizes and layout are optimized to ensure balanced airflow throughout the system.
    • Increasing energy consumption. A rise in your household energy bills when your usage habits haven’t changed and you keep the HVAC equipment well maintained may be directly related to energy losses from deteriorating ducts.
    • Evidence of decay or damage. Although you can’t examine ductwork behind your walls and ceilings, you can assess the overall condition of the ducts by checking accessible sections in the attic, garage or crawlspace. Issues to look for include holes and gaps in the ductwork, crushed or disconnected sections, corroded metal and a lack of insulation.
    • Declining air quality. If the return side of your duct system is suffering from age-related deterioration, all kinds of harmful and unhealthy particles can be drawn into the HVAC system and pollute your air supply. If anyone in the household is experiencing worsening allergies, asthma or other breathing problems, the duct system should be inspected.
    • Comfort issues. If you’re dealing with temperature inconsistencies and hot or cold spots in different rooms, poor overall ductwork design, leaks and deterioration may be impacting how much heated or cooled air reaches the registers.

    If you’re concerned that old ductwork may be negatively affecting comfort, air quality and energy efficiency in your Broken Arrow home, contact us at Air Assurance for an expert duct system inspection.

    Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about ductwork and other HVAC topics, download our free Home Comfort Guide or call us at 918-217-8273.

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