HVAC

Duct System

Ductless Technology Myths Busted

Ductless Technology Myths Busted

If you’re considering a ductless mini split system for your home, don’t let ductless technology myths stand in your way. Before ruling a ductless system out based on what you’ve heard, consider these facts that dispel the myths.

Myth #1: They can go anywhere.

This is not quite true, although ductless system offer a lot of flexibility. The position of the air handler in the room depends on the size of the room and its layout.The outdoor condenser should be placed as close to the air handler as possible to limit the length of the conduit that the mini split requires. A shorter conduit improves the energy efficiency of the mini split.

Myth #2: They’re only good for remodels or add-ons.

Nothing could be further from the truth. Ductless mini splits work well in new construction as well. They don’t require square footage for ductwork, don’t need a special room or closet to house the air handler and act as zoning systems.Each air handler for a mini split has its own thermostat, which means you can turn it off when you’re not using the space. The ability to zone saves energy dollars, as well as extends the life of each mini split.

Myth #3: Ductless systems are just for supplemental heating and cooling.

Properly sized, a ductless system will keep any interior space comfortable. In order to get the most comfort and efficiency from each mini split, the room should be well insulated and have few air leaks.It’s always best to work with a reputable HVAC contractor from start to finish to find the best system for you and avoid all the ductless technology myths.

Myth #4: A mini split can’t be used with ductwork.

HVAC engineers have found that ductless air handlers work as efficiently, if not more so, than central heat pumps. Many ductless systems use inverter technology that saves substantial amounts of electricity, as do the thermostats on the separate air handlers.

If you’ve like more information about these ductless technology myths and others, contact the pros at Air Assurance. We provide HVAC services for Broken Arrow homeowners.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

Thermostats

How to Adjust Your Thermostat for the End of Daylight Saving Time

How to Adjust Your Thermostat for the End of Daylight Saving Time

With Daylight Saving Time over, you'll need to set back all your clocks by an hour. For peace of mind that your HVAC can provide optimal comfort and energy savings throughout the winter, you can use the fall time change as a reminder to adjust your thermostat in the following ways:

Check That the Thermostat Clock Changes

If you own a programmable thermostat, it probably makes automatic clock adjustments twice a year, at the beginning and end of the daylight saving time period. To ensure that your programming stays on schedule, it's good to verify that this time change was made so you can adjust it manually if necessary.

Switch to Heating Mode

If your HVAC is still in cooling mode, now's the time to make the change over to heating so your home stays comfortably warm and cozy.

Recheck Your Programming Schedule

When you've made the switch to heating, you should look at your programming schedule and make any necessary adjustments to maximize your comfort and energy savings. You should set a personalized schedule to match your family's usual routine, but you can also follow these basic setting tips:

  • Make overnight temperature setbacks. At night when the family is sleeping, schedule 10--15-degree temperature setbacks.

  • Set weekday temperature adjustments. If the house isn't occupied on weekdays when everyone off to school or work, program setbacks of up to 10 degrees.

  • Prime your setback periods for savings. To reap the greatest energy savings, aim for eight-hour setback periods each day.

  • Allow ample time for warming up the house. When you're programming your setbacks, don't forget to factor in warm up periods so the house reaches your target temperature when you normally get up and arrive home.

Replace Your Thermostat Batteries

When you're at the thermostat making necessary adjustments for daylight saving time, take a few extra moments to put in fresh batteries so you know the device will stay working reliably all through the winter.

For more advice about adjusting your Broken Arrow home's thermostat for the end of daylight saving time, contact us today at Air Assurance.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

Furnaces

Then vs. Now: Furnaces

Then vs. Now: Furnaces

Since prehistoric days, when people gathered around a fire in the dead of winter, humans have sought ways to keep warm. How have those ways evolved over the centuries? How have they led to the technologies that heat our homes today? Let's take a look at the history of furnaces.

History of Furnaces

Among the first to develop central heating were the ancient Romans. They introduced radiant floor heating by building a fire in the basement, which would heat the stone floor above it. And since hot air rises, the heat from the floor would soon spread to the rest of the house.The first heating sources used wood for fuel. This included the Franklin Stove, invented by Benjamin Franklin in 1741. Made of cast iron, it was designed to produce more heat than a regular fireplace, with less exhaust.Then in 1885, a new furnace was developed, which burned coal, which replaced wood as the standard. It produced more heat and used a system of ducts in the basement to transport that heat to the rest of the home. Then in 1919, Alice Parker invented the first modern central heating system. It replaced coal with natural gas, and distributed heat evenly throughout the home using a system of pipes.

Today's Furnaces

Today's furnace designs have come a long way since then. Top furnaces can operate with over 98% efficiency, providing more heat for less energy. Zoning systems now allow you to heat each part of the house according to its individual needs. Some can even sense whether or not a space is occupied, so you don't pay to heat empty rooms. And smart thermostats let you adjust your home's temperature from anywhere, via your mobile device.There are a variety of amazing features available on today's furnaces. When buying a new system, make a list of your home's heating needs and talk to an HVAC expert to find the furnace that's right for you.

To learn more about the history of furnaces, and tips for furnace buying, contact us at Air Assurance. We proudly serve Broken Arrow's HVAC needs.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

HVAC system

HVAC During Mild Weather

HVAC During Mild Weather

Setting the thermostat for fall, when the weather is still mild, can be rather perplexing. Since it may be still a bit too warm in the daytime to turn off the air conditioner altogether, or not yet chilly enough at night to turn on the heating, you may have to do some adjusting with your fall HVAC settings.

Let the Fresh Air In

If the weather allows, by all means, turn the system off in fall and fling open the windows so you can enjoy some fresh air before winter arrives. Be sure you turn the system to "off" so that it doesn't come on while the windows are open.

Setting the Thermostat

If you've created an energy-efficient schedule with your air conditioner by raising or lowering the thermostat for periods throughout the day depending on when people are home, sleeping or inactive, you will probably need to adjust the schedule as the weather cools, and for time changes.For the fall, it may be you will want to change that schedule to turn the air conditioner on for just a couple of brief periods each day, and leave it off for the rest of the day so you can open windows. Or, as the season advances and it gets chillier, you will want to turn on the heating just for brief times in the morning, when people are getting ready for work, and in the evening, when you're dining or getting ready for bed.To save money, you can use ceiling fans, portable fans and even an occasional space heater to cool off or warm up those who aren't comfortable with your thermostat settings. If they are chilly, they can add layers of clothing or an extra blanket at night. That way, you may even be able to turn the system off altogether at night.

Obviously, the chances for a serious cold front to make its way into our region will mount as fall advances, so be ready to reset the thermostat as needed.Need more advice on fall HVAC settings? Contact Air Assurance of Broken Arrow.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

HVAC system

How Fog Machines and Halloween Decorations Affect Your Home's HVAC Efficiency

How Fog Machines and Halloween Decorations Affect Your Home's HVAC Efficiency

Halloween celebrations might make a dent in your home’s HVAC efficiency if you use some kinds of candles and lamp oil or use a fog machine indoors. The sheer number of times you open the door may cool your home, but if you’re having a party, count on plenty of body heat.

Steps to Take:

  • Keep your front door closed between trick-or-treaters if it’s a cold night. Make it more fun by decorating the outside so that the kids see it as they walk to the door.

  • Nobody would argue that fog machines create an authentically scary ambience, but they’ll also cool the air off if you use the misting types. The other kinds that use “fog juice” create heat indoors. You may want to change your HVAC filter to get rid of any particulates that collect on the filter after Halloween is over.

  • Burning candles creates a good deal of ambience but they also emit a lot of heat and soot if they’re made from paraffin wax. If the party is large enough or there are enough candles, it’s conceivable that you’d need to turn on the air conditioner to cool the air.

  • Soot from candles and even lamp oil will also collect in your home’s air and could harm your air filters, The particles can quickly clog the filters and coat the inside of the air handler, reducing HVAC efficiency. If you must use candles, opt for clean burning beeswax or soy products. Look for smoke-free lamp oil. Adjust the wicks so that they don’t smoke.

  • Parties create heat. If you’re hosting a party, it won’t take long to notice that your home is warming up from all the body and cooking heat. If your party will be crowded, prepare ahead by turning down the furnace ahead of time. You may need to switch from heating to cooling if it gets too warm or open the windows.

Having your HVAC efficiency checked before the celebrations start will help you maintain comfort regardless of the weather or party size. For more information, contact Air Assurance, providing HVAC services for Broken Arrow homeowners.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

Featured

HVAC-Inspired Costumes for the Whole Family

HVAC-Inspired Costumes for the Whole Family

Before long, neighborhoods will be teeming with ghouls, superheroes, cartoon characters, and all other sorts of wacky and amazing Halloween costumes. But, did you realize that HVAC-inspired costumes are often easy to put together and can really stand out in a crowd? Here are a few of our favorites for this year:

HVAC Worker Costumes

You have two routes you can take here. First, you can play it straight and dress up as a service technician, plumber, electrician, etc. The second choice is to get a little more inventive. For instance, you could use a ton of hairspray and go as an electrocuted electrician orsplatter yourself with brown paint and go as a plumber who's experienced a sewer backup (gross, we know... but funny, right?). Plus, you could add a little flare and scare by using make-up to create a zombie look for the costume.

Dryer Vent Costumes

Who would've thought that your dryer vent could give you so many options for Halloween costumes? You can use them as the arms and legs of an awesome looking robot, fashion them into the mechanical arms of Dr. Octopus, create your own Tin Man from The Wizard of Oz, or go all out and celebrate the holiday as Slinky from Toy Story.

Fortnite Costume Accessories

This year, costumes based on the insanely popular video game Fortnite are likely to be everywhere. A big part of the game concerns weapons used against your opponents, but fake guns are so yesterday. Instead, we suggest that you use a plunger to create either the clinger weapon or the game's grappling hook (you can easily Google what they look like). Just be sure that you purchase a new plunger for the costume. We definitely don't want kids running around outside with one taken from a toilet.

For more expert advice on HVAC-inspired Halloween costumes or any home comfort topics, contact the professionals at Air Assurance. We've been serving the needs of Broken Arrow and the surrounding area for more than 30 years.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

HVAC system

How New Steel and Aluminum Tariffs Affect the U.S. HVAC Industry

How New Steel and Aluminum Tariffs Affect the U.S. HVAC Industry

Tariffs on the steel industry have been all over the news. One side claims they're great, the other side says they're disastrous. You don't work in the steel industry, though. Do the tariffs still affect you? Yes. For one thing, steel tariffs are causing HVAC industry changes that affect homeowners everywhere.

Examining the Tariffs

The current administration has imposed a 25 percent tariff on steel from other countries and a 10 percent tariff on aluminum. Both materials are significant elements in the manufacture of HVAC systems, from furnaces to heat pumps to air conditioners.With steel and aluminum more expensive to obtain, the cost of manufacturing HVAC equipment is going up. If the manufacturers want to make money, they'll have to raise their prices. Many already have. That not only means that purchasing an HVAC system will become more expensive, but likely having yours repaired as well. If your unit needs a replacement part made of steel, the cost will be higher.The increases in price don't just apply to steel and aluminum products, either. Some HVAC manufacturers are raising their prices on all their products, regardless of their materials, simply to compensate for the volatility of the industry and the impact it's had on them across the board.

What Can You Do?

If the steel tariffs are making life more expensive for you, you can always contact your congressperson and/or senators to let them know how you feel about the situation. Aside from that, though, the best thing to do amid these HVAC industry changes is what you've always done: shop around for the best prices and the best value.Find a system that will last you a long time. Look for one with good energy efficiency, so that the money you save on power bills can offset the extra that you're paying to buy the unit. And keep it well-maintained, to avoid needing lots of repairs and replacement parts.

To learn more about HVAC industry changes from steel tariffs and other factors, contact us at Air Assurance. We're Broken Arrow's trusted source for quality heating and cooling solutions.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

HVAC system

Protect Your Outdoor Unit from Falling Leaves

Protect Your Outdoor Unit from Falling Leaves

It’s easy to forget about the air conditioner when it’s not running daily to keep you comfortable. During the offseason, consider outdoor HVAC unit protection to keep it in good shape so it’s ready to go next spring. Heat pump users, especially, need to stay on top of the outdoor condenser to get the most efficient and effective heating from their units.

Why It Matters

The outdoor condenser contains the compressor and the condensing coil, both vital parts of any air conditioner or heat pump. The compressor changes the pressure of the refrigerant to make it cold enough to remove the excess heat from your home’s air. The refrigerant moves from the indoor air handler into the condensing coil, where a large fan blows away the heat it collected indoors.

When leaves or any other kind of vegetation block the air amount of air going through the condenser, it takes longer for the refrigerant to cool. It drives up energy bills and increases the time it takes to cool your home. Longer running times create excessive wear on the compressor, your system’s most expensive part.

Condenser Upkeep

Rake leaves away. Keep an eye on the amount of leaves building around the condenser and rake them away as they collect. Bag them, along with other landscaping debris, to keep them from blowing back.

Trim overhanging tree branches. Remove any branches that hang over the condenser or nearby by as part of outdoor HVAC unit protection. Throw a tarp over the condenser as you work to prevent sawdust and leaves from falling inside it.

Cover it. If you don’t plan to use the A/C or heat pump all winter, cover it for the season. You can find covers at home improvement centers or hardware stores. Be sure you check it periodically to make sure rodents aren’t living inside.

It’s important to provide outdoor HVAC unit protection from leaves even in the off-season to keep this appliance clean and unobstructed. To learn more, contact Air Assurance, providing HVAC services for Broken Arrow homeowners.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

Safety

Safety Hazards of a Multi-Purpose Furnace Room 

Safety Hazards of a Multi-Purpose Furnace Room

Safety should always be a top priority in every household. Unfortunately, many homeowners make simple mistakes without considering what might happen. A great example is when families create storage in mechanical room areas of the home, primarily where their furnace is located. This results in a fire just waiting to happen.

People Own More Stuff

It's getting a little ridiculous at how much "stuff" exists that you can buy these days. Many households are full of boxes with everything from Christmas ornaments and legal documents to comic books and action figures. Much of what we buy will end up in a box somewhere, which necessitates the need for more storare areas around your home. So, why not use the furnace room, right? Wrong!

The Dangers of Using a Furnace Room for Storage

When you place storage items in an area that houses a source of heat, you're asking for trouble. If the furnace isn't operating properly or your personal belongings are too close to the furnace, a fire could ignite. This is especially true if you're storing items like half-empty paint cans, cleaning supplies, or solvents. Don't laugh - we've probably all put these items in places that weren't entirely safe.

What You Can Do to Prevent a Fire

The good news is that preventing a fire in the room where your furnace is stored is rather simple. Here are some quick rules that you can follow:

  • Remove any flammable materials such as storage boxes, cleaning materials, and other items discussed throughout this article.

  • Equip your home with smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

  • Have a fire extinguisher readily accessible in the kitchen and near the furnace area.

  • Hire a technician to perform an annual check of the system to keep it operating properly.

  • Never block the entrance or area around the furnace in case firefighters require access.

For more advice on safe storage in mechanical room areas, or if you have any other questions related to home comfort, reach out to the experts at Air Assurance. We've been serving the HVAC needs of Broken Arrow and the surrounding areas since 1985.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

Thermostats

Manual vs Programmable vs Smart: Which Thermostat Option is Right for Your Home?

Manual vs Programmable vs Smart: Which Thermostat Option is Right for Your Home?

The thermostat is a vital part of your home comfort system. It's tasked with keeping the indoor temperature at your desired level. Thermostat technology has advanced by leaps and bounds. Thermostats now range from manual to programmable to smart. Each type has its own set of advantages. Let's delve deeper into these thermostat options to help you establish the best choice for your needs.

Manual Thermostats

More often than not, these simple devices are found in older homes. They usually have a manual dial that you have to rotate to adjust the desired temperature. Digital manual thermostats have up and down arrows instead of dials.

Programmable Thermostats

These thermostats adjust your home's temperature automatically. For example, in the winter, you can program them to cool your home down a little while you're at work to avoid wasting energy on an empty house and start heating it up before you return. The predetermined schedule you can give these devices to operate by varies from one model to another. Some only allow you to create one schedule whereas others can allow two or more different schedules.

Smart Thermostats

These offer all the benefits of programmable thermostats. Additionally, you can control them with your smartphone, allow them to learn your routines and adapt to them, and even use them to monitor your energy usage.

What's The Best Option For You?

Manual thermostats can be inconvenient and imprecise. Also, they don't offer any energy savings. If you still own one, you should upgrade to a programmable or smart model. If cost is a significant consideration or you just want something to help you program your HVAC system while you're away, you can go for a programmable thermostat. But if you're tech savvy and want maximum control and convenience, a smart thermostat is your best bet.Upgrading your thermostat will help you maximize the efficiency of your heating and cooling system and lower your energy bills. If you need installation, repair, or replacement of any of the above thermostat options in the Broken Arrow area, contact the professionals at Air Assurance.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

HVAC system

Ways to Protect Your Home from Dust Mites

Ways to Protect Your Home from Dust Mites

Dust mites are tiny creatures that feed on dust inside your home. If dusty areas make you sniffly, this is an allergic reaction to these mites. You can keep them at bay by keeping your home as clean as possible and taking other steps. Find out more about dust mite protection for your home in Broken Arrow.

Maintain the Right Humidity Level

Dust mites thrive when your home is more humid than it should be. Ideally, the humidity level in your bedroom, where dust mites are commonly found, should be kept at 50 percent or lower. Dust mites do best in environments where the humidity level is 70 percent or higher. Using a portable dehumidifier in your bedroom or having a whole-home dehumidifier installed makes it easier for you to control the humidity level and reduce these pests.

Change Your HVAC Filter

Changing your HVAC filter on a regular basis, such as every month or every other month, helps cut down on the amount of dust you have in your home. This helps keep dust mite populations down in your home. Consider switching to an HVAC filter that offers higher efficiency, which helps ensure that it’s able to trap as many dust particles as possible.

Dust and Vacuum Regularly

One of the most effective dust protection methods is to reduce the amount of dust in your home overall. You can do this by dusting and vacuuming your home on a regular basis. You should dust and vacuum a few times a week or more often if you have pets in your home, since their dander can create more dust.

Invest in an Air Purifier

Air purifiers won’t get rid of dust mites, but they do help remove dust from the air inside your home. This helps cut down on the amount of dust you have, which can help reduce the dust mite population you have.

If you need help with maintaining the right humidity level or need dust mite protection advice, please contact Air Assurance. Our HVAC team can provide you with the service you need to discourage dust mites.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

HVAC system

Questions First-Time HVAC Purchasers Should Ask

Questions First-Time HVAC Purchasers Should Ask

Your HVAC system contains some of your home's most expensive and essential equipment, so making a first-time purchase when it needs replacement can be a daunting experience. You can make HVAC purchases less stressful and more successful by carefully choosing your installer and getting the right answers to some important questions.

What to Do and Ask Before an HVAC Purchase

There's more to a successful HVAC equipment purchase than just choosing between different models. Having the equipment installed properly makes a big difference in its energy consumption, performance and lifespan. To ensure a quality installation, you want to choose a reputable, well-established HVAC contractor with industry expertise. For peace of mind that you're hiring the right installer, consider the answers you get when you ask the following questions too:

How do you size my equipment?

Installing poorly-sized equipment can have long-term repercussions. Oversized HVAC with too much capacity will short-cycle, which wastes energy. Undersized equipment simply won't keep your home warm or cool enough. A knowledgeable installer will tell you they do a load calculation for accurate sizing, not just match the old equipment or use a “rule of thumb.”

Is my existing ductwork okay?

A contractor worth hiring will say they have to verify that the ductwork design provides balanced airflow and the ducts are free from damage and leaks before installing your new HVAC equipment.

How can I compare efficiency ratings?

A dependable HVAC pro knows that higher-rated equipment that's more efficient is less expensive to operate, but costs more upfront. They'll help you weigh the price tag vs. potential energy savings for different models so you can make an informed choice within your budget.

What equipment features are worthwhile?

Some HVAC equipment models have optional features that can enhance energy efficiency and your comfort. A good contractor should tell you about any beneficial features that match your home and budget, and may recommend options like a variable-speed compressor, air handler or furnace, or installing a zoning system or smart thermostat.

For personalized help making informed HVAC purchases for your Broken Arrow home, contact us at Air Assurance.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

Air Conditioning

Best Heating and Cooling Options for Sunrooms

Best Heating and Cooling Options for Sunrooms

A sunroom or enclosed patio offers a great place to unwind, but this part of your home can get uncomfortably hot during the summer months. You don’t have to avoid using this area of your home when it’s hot out. Instead, learn more about sunroom HVAC solutions and other ways to keep this area cool.

Choose a Ductless Mini-Split HVAC System

A ductless mini-split HVAC system is one that is designed to be flexible, which makes them ideal for sunrooms and enclosed patios. With this type of HVAC system, you don’t need to have ductwork installed or pay to have your current HVAC system extended into this part of your home. With a ductless mini-split system, you can easily control the temperature in your sunroom, which helps you save on your cooling bills.

Install a Ceiling Fan

If your sunroom doesn’t have a ceiling fan, consider having one installed. Ceiling fans don’t generate cold air for sunrooms, but they do move air around. This movement can help your skin feel cooler when you’re sitting in your sunroom, even on a hot summer day. You can also use portable fans for additional air movement if needed.

Add or Improve Insulation

Having the right amount of insulation in the ceiling of your sunroom helps cut down on the amount of heat that passes through it. Have an HVAC technician check your insulation to determine if you need more added. This should help your sunroom stay at a cooler temperature during summer.

Install Blinds or Shades

If you don’t have any window treatments in your sunroom, this lets more sunlight into this area. Putting blinds or shades on your sunroom windows allows you to control how much sunlight gets into this part of your home. Keeping the blinds or shades closed when the sun is facing those windows can help your sunroom feel cooler.

If you need more information on sunroom HVAC solutions for your home in Broken Arrow, please contact Air Assurance today. We provide dependable service that will help your sunroom stay cool and comfortable.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

HVAC system

Typical Lifespan of HVAC Components

Typical Lifespan of HVAC Components

Your HVAC isn't just some of your home's most expensive equipment, it's also crucial for your family's comfort, so it makes good sense to know how long you can expect it to last.

HVAC lifespan typically ranges from 10 to 25 years, and it varies depending on the equipment type:

Gas furnaces can last for 15-25 years. Most often, they need replacement due to issues like cracks or corrosion of the most expensive component, the heat exchanger. Split-system air conditioners have lifespans of 7-20 years. The summers here in Oklahoma mean that A/Cs get a lot of use, so they may need replacement sooner due to coil corrosion or compressor failure. Heat pumps and ductless mini-splits can last for up to 25 years. Since these units heat and cool, year-round use may shorten their service life.

Other Factors that Impact HVAC Component Lifespan

Beyond the type of equipment, these additional factors can affect the life expectancy of your home's HVAC components:

Initial quality.

Equipment that's cheaply built is less likely to last over the long term, and it can also have construction or design flaws that shorten its life.

Sizing accuracy and installation.

For a long lifespan, HVAC equipment needs to be sized correctly for your home, and installed with care to the manufacturer's specific requirements.

Preventive maintenance.

HVAC components are like any other kind of mechanical equipment: they perform better, break down less often and last longer when they receive timely preventive maintenance.

Ways to Maximize HVAC Lifespan

Here's some advice to help you prevent life-shortening problems in new HVAC equipment or your current components:Only hire a reputable HVAC contractor when you purchase new equipment. This ensures that a load calculation is done to size the capacity correctly, and the manufacturer's specifications and best practices are followed during installation.Invest in twice-yearly preventive maintenance over your equipment's lifespan so it stays in the best possible working condition.

For expert installations and maintenance to help the comfort equipment in your Broken Arrow home reach or exceed the typical HVAC lifespan, contact us today at Air Assurance.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

HVAC system

Keeping Bugs Out of Your System This Summer

Keeping Bugs Out of Your System This Summer

Pesky bugs showing up around your house? Here are some quick tips that you can implement right now to avoid bugs in HVAC equipment.

Change the Air Filter

While there's a good chance that you know how a clogged air filter can impede the flow of air and affect the efficiency of your HVAC system, you may not be aware that it can also cause a moisture build-up. This moisture becomes an attractive spot for bugs, which is one more reason why you should change the filter on a regular basis.

Seal the Home's Ductwork

Over time, our home's ductwork becomes stressed from contstant use, causing tears and holes to appear. This is how insects are able to get inside your ductwork, which then leads them to the HVAC equipment itself. Foil tape and sealant are all you need to solve this problem, but if you need professional assistance, don't be afraid to ask.

Clean Up Around the Outdoor Unit

All types of insects, including bees and wasps, have been known to invade an HVAC system's outoor unit. Many of these little creatures are attracted by vegetation, debris, and moisture surrounding the system. Your best bet is to keep the area clean and free of vegetation approximately two feet in all directions around the unit.

Call an Exterminator

It's always a good idea to call a pest control expert on a regular basis to keep bugs out of your home. Insects are a nuisance, and no matter where they hole up - whether it's in your HVAC equipment or someplace else - an infestation can be damaging to your home itself. This is especially true if the area you live in is known to be a haven for the tiny creatures. 

For more expert advice on preventing bugs in HVAC equipment, or if you have any other home comfort concerns, please contact the professionals at Air Assurance. We serve the needs of Broken Arrow and the surrounding areas.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

HVAC system

School's Out: Changing Your HVAC Schedule

School’s Out: Changing Your HVAC Schedule

You always want your children to be comfortable. Since kids will be spending more time at home in the summer, you'll need to take the necessary steps to keep your home cool enough for your little ones. Here are some useful tips on how to adjust your home's HVAC schedule accordingly.

When at Home

When your kids are at home, it's best to set your thermostat to 78 degrees. This will not only keep them comfortable but also save you money. You can make your home's cooling system more effective by taking the following steps.

  • Invest in a dehumidifier.

  • Replace worn weatherstripping and caulk around your windows and doors to keep your house sealed.

  • Install window treatments to block out the sun's rays.

  • Set ceiling fans to spin counterclockwise.

When Nobody's Home

Whether you're taking your children to soccer, for a walk in the park, or going on a bike ride, you should alter your home's temperature settings when everyone's away. Turn your thermostat up to 85 to 88 degrees to keep your home warmer than usual.If you have a standard thermostat, you'll have to manually adjust the temperature each time you and your kids are leaving the house. With a programmable thermostat, you can program a different cooling schedule for a specific time of the day or each day of the week, depending on your family's schedule. You simply set it and forget it. Be sure to follow these programming timing tips when using a programmable thermostat:

  • Reset the thermostat to 78 degrees 30 minutes before returning home.

  • Reduce cooling an hour before going to bed each night.

  • Increase the cooling about 30 minutes before your wake up time.

Adopting the HVAC schedule above will keep your entire family comfortable and your cooling bills lower. For more home comfort and energy efficiency tips, contact the experts at Air Assurance. For more than 30 years, we've helped homeowners in the Broken Arrow area with their HVAC needs and won numerous awards for our exceptional services.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

Featured, HVAC system

Keep Guests Cool at Summer Parties

Keep Guests Cool at Summer Parties

Summer parties are the best, but when guests are uncomfortable because of the sweltering heat, they can turn into a disaster. We'd hate to see that happen, so we've compiled some of our favorite tips to help you keep your guests cool:

Get a Checkup for Your HVAC System

Like clockwork, you should be scheduling a yearly inspection of your cooling system by an HVAC professional. This will keep your system running more efficiently for your guests (and you, of course) while prolonging its lifespan.

Change the Air Filter

If you want to keep your guests cool, then you need to make sure that your HVAC system is as efficient as possible. If the air filter is dirty, then that's not happening. Replace it at the beginning of the summer season and then get it replaced every 30 days or so after that, as needed.

Consider an Evening Party

Everyone loves a good BBQ in the middle of the day, but the heat might bother some guests. A great way to keep them cool during summer parties is by taking away the sun. No, they don't have an app for that, so your best bet is to schedule your party in the evening.

Serve Plenty of Liquids

Guests who become dehydrated are not only unhappy, but could be in serious danger. You can solve this problem by providing plenty of water and other refreshing drinks. This is essential if you're serving alcohol since those will add to the dehydration.

Provide Tons of Shade

If you prefer to have an outdoor party during the day, then you should ensure that your guests have plenty of shade to shield themselves from the summer sun. If your backyard is lacking, there are plenty of shading choices that can be set up and taken down for each get-together.

To schedule services to ensure your guests stay cool at summer parties, reach out to the professionals at Air Assurance. We've been serving the HVAC needs of Broken Arrow and the surrounding areas for more than 30 years.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

HVAC system

HVAC Parts Every Homeowner Should Recognize

HVAC Parts Every Homeowner Should Recognize

 It's no secret your HVAC system is one of the most important elements of your Oklahoma home. For you to keep it working efficiently throughout the year, it's vital that you understand its basic components. Read on to learn more about the essential HVAC parts.

Thermostat

This is the panel you use to adjust your home's temperature. It controls the rest of your HVAC system. If you still use a manual thermostat and want more energy savings and home comfort, switch to a programmable thermostat.

Furnace

This is the heart of your home's heating system. It consists of a blower cabinet and burner cabinet. It's usually installed in a designated spot, usually the basement, attic, or special cabinet. If you hear groaning, banging, and whirring noises coming from it, you should contact an HVAC professional. A blue furnace pilot light shows your system is safe whereas a yellow one shows you may be having a carbon monoxide problem.

Heat Exchanger

It's the HVAC component that actually warms your home. It's located inside your furnace unit. When it's on, air is sucked into it from the outdoors or through specific indoor vents. This air is heated rapidly and then blown into your home via the ductwork.

Condensing Unit

The unit sits outside the home. It cools a special refrigerant gas, which is transported to the evaporator coil after sufficient cooling. It's crucial to keep the area around this unit clear of fallen leaves and other debris to avoid diminishing its efficiency.

Evaporator Coil

It's located inside the house and is responsible for providing cool air for your home. The cold refrigerant inside it absorbs heat and moisture from your home's air.

Ducts

They deliver hot or cold air to your home. Having them sealed by a professional will make your home more energy efficient.

Knowing the HVAC parts involved in your system's operation helps you spot problems when they arise more easily and fix them before they get bigger. If you need excellent and dependable HVAC service in the Broken Arrow area, don't hesitate to contact the experts at Air Assurance.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

HVAC system

What's the Difference Between HVAC and A/C?

What is an Air Exchange Rate and Why is it Important?

If you're like most homeowners, you find HVAC terms confusing, and since some seem interchangeable, it can be hard to know exactly what terminology like “HVAC” and “A/C” really means. Although they're similar, these two terms aren't synonymous, so it's beneficial to know the differences between the two.

Definition of HVAC

The meaning of the term “HVAC” is heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Most often, this acronym is used in reference to a home's complete comfort system. A system may be comprised of various heating and cooling components, such as a gas furnace, electric central split air conditioner or heat pump, ductless mini split units, or geothermal heat pump system. The system's ventilation portion often refers to the air circulation/distribution components like the blower unit, ductwork and air filter, but it can also include a whole-house ventilation unit, or an air cleaner unit added to the HVAC system.

What A/C Means

The term “A/C” stands for “air conditioning,” but it's frequently used to describe any type of home cooling equipment, such as a traditional split-system air conditioner or heat pump, mini-split unit, geothermal system, or even a window unit.

Different Types of Equipment Have Different Maintenance Needs

Routine preventive maintenance is the key to keeping any sort of comfort equipment running reliably and efficiently, so all the common components of your HVAC system should be inspected, cleaned and tuned-up by a skilled technician on a twice-yearly basis. Different portions in your home's HVAC system also need specific maintenance tasks performed, such as:

  • Cooling equipment: Before cooling season begins, the evaporator and condenser coils should be cleaned, the condensate drain flushed and the refrigerant level checked.

  • Heating equipment: Every fall, the gas burner should be cleaned and tested, and the venting system and heat exchanger inspected.

  • Ventilation components: With every preventive maintenance visit, your technician should clean and lubricate the blower assembly, check for proper system airflow, and install a fresh air filter.

To learn more about the meaning of different HVAC terms and how they relate to the comfort system in your Broken Arrow home, contact us at Air Assurance.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.

Air Conditioning

What is Short Cycling? And How to Avoid It

What is Short Cycling? And How to Avoid It

If your air conditioner’s not delivering optimum performance and/or operating costs seem high, the system could be short cycling. In order for the cooling process to reach 100 percent effectiveness and efficiency, a central air conditioner needs to run for a certain minimum time before it cycles off again.In most cases, you should hear the A/C cycle on and then run for at least 10 minutes before shutting down. In addition to inadequate cooling, short cycling is hard on critical system components, especially the compressor, which may incur excess wear and tear from extended periods of rapid on/off cycling.Here are three scenarios that may result in air conditioner short cycling:

BTU capacity is too large.

A professional HVAC installation always includes a cooling load calculation to determine the cooling requirements of the house and match an A/C unit with the appropriate BTU capacity. If the cooling load was not accurately determined, the air conditioner may have excessive capacity and produce too much cooling too rapidly, resulting in short cycling. An HVAC contractor can perform a cooling load calculation to determine if the air conditioner is oversized.

Airflow is insufficient.

Typically the result of a clogged air filter, failing blower or other malfunction, airflow that falls below specifications may cause the evaporator coil to ice up and obstruct all airflow. From that point, every time the system cycles on it will quickly cycle back off again. Resolving airflow issues and coil ice formation is usually a straightforward procedure for a qualified service technician.

Leaking refrigerant.

Small leaks in the coils or refrigerant lines may cause the refrigerant charge to drop too low. A sensor detects the low charge level and automatically shuts the system down—usually only after a few minutes of operation—to avoid costly damage to the compressor. Using leak detection technology, an HVAC tech can pinpoint the leak, repair it and then restore refrigerant charge to the proper level.

If you suspect short cycling, restore cooling performance and efficiency and prevent damage to critical components by contacting the professionals at Air Assurance for a complete evaluation.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in the Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma area about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). For more information about other HVAC topics, call us at 918-217-8273.